Grange (@1.62) vs Shane O'Neills (@2.63)
06-10-2019

Our Prediction:

Grange will win

Grange – Shane O'Neills Match Prediction | 06-10-2019 11:00

J. The nickname "Shane the Proud" (Irish: Sen an Domais), which appears in nineteenth and early twentieth century popular histories, was coined some time after his death by English writers, and originally had the pejorative meaning of "arrogant", because they wished to portray him as vain, self-indulgent and ruthless, and thus undermine the legitimacy of his claim to the earldom of Tyrone.[6]Holinshed's Chronicles of 1587, for instance, had a side-note, "The proud taunts of Shane O'neile", the text remarking that "when the commissioners were sent to intreat with him vpon sundrie points, they found him most arrogant & out of all good order, braieng out speches not met nor semelie."[7] Later Irish writers, such as John Mitchel and P.

The O'Neill ravaged the Pale, failed in an attempt on Dundalk, made a truce with the MacDonnells, and sought help from the Earl of Desmond. The English invaded Donegal and restored O'Donnell. This victory greatly strengthened Shane O'Neill's position, and Sir Henry Sidney, who became lord deputy in 1565, declared to the earl of Leicester that "Lucifer himself was not more puffed up with pride and ambition than O'Neill".

He allied himself instead with the MacDonnells, the most powerful of these immigrants. Shane, however, refused to put himself in the power of Sussex without a guarantee for his safety; and his claims were so exacting that Elizabeth determined to restore Brian. An attempt to incite the ODonnells against him, however, was frustrated. Shane, the eldest legitimate son of Conn ONeill, was a chieftain whose support the English considered worth gaining; but he rejected overtures from the Earl of Sussex, the lord deputy, and refused to help the English against the Scottish settlers on the coast of Antrim. Nevertheless, Queen Elizabeth I of England was disposed to come to terms with Shane, who after his fathers death was de facto chief of the ONeill clan. She recognized his claims to the chieftainship, thus throwing over a kinsman, Brian ONeill.

Elizabeth, whose prudence and parsimony were averse to so formidable an undertaking as the complete subjugation of the powerful O'Neill, desired peace with him at almost any price. An attempt by Sussex to increase the enmity of the O'Donnells against the O'Neill was frustrated by his seizure of Calvagh O'Donnell in a monastery. Elizabeth's faith in Sussex's aggressive strategy diminished when the repeated annual devastations of O'Neill's territory by the Lord Deputy with sizeable and expensive armies failed to bring him to submission.

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4, 1562. Accompanied by Ormonde and Kildare he reached London on Jan. Elizabeth, who was not prepared to undertake the subjugation of the Irish chieftain, urgently desired peace with him, especially when the devastation of his territory by Sussex brought him no nearer to submission. Sussex was not supported by the queen, who sent the Earl of Kildare to arrange terms with Shane. Elizabeth temporized; but finding that Shane was in danger of becoming a tool in the hands of Spanish intriguers, she permitted him to return to Ireland, recognizing him as the ONeill, and chieftain of Tyrone. The latter agreed to present himself before Elizabeth.

The Under-14 Girls team formed in the early 2000s won the Armagh championship in 2009. In the same year they were runners-up in the All-County League, and participated in the Kilmacud 7s and Ulster and All-Ireland File competitions.

Shane O'Neill (Irish: Sen Mac Cuinn Nill; c. This brought him into conflict with competing branches of the O'Neill family and with the English government in Ireland, who recognised a rival claim. Shanes's support was considered worth gaining by the English even during the lifetime of his father Conn O'Neill, 1st Earl of Tyrone (died 1559). 1530 2 June 1567), was an Irish chieftain of the O'Neill dynasty of Ulster in the mid 16th century. Shane O'Neill's career was marked by his ambition to be The O'Neill sovereign of the dominant O'Neill family of Tr Eoghainand thus overlord of the entire province. But rejecting overtures from Thomas Radclyffe, 3rd Earl of Sussex, the lord deputy from 1556, Shane refused to help the English against the Scottish settlers on the coast of Antrim, allying himself instead with the MacDonnells, the most powerful of these immigrants.

Arthur and Dan Gibson went on to represent County Antrim. It is situated in the outskirts of Glenarm village in Feystown and has over 100 members. Antrim GAA has a Gaelic football club named in his honour, Shane O'Neill's GFC, founded by the solicitor and antiquarian Francis Joseph Bigger. Shane O'Neill's hurling club was the first official GAA club in Glenarm, founded in 1903 using land donated by the Gibson family of the Libbert, Glenarm. There is also a Shane O'Neill's GAC in Camloch, County Armagh.

All Shane's marriages were of this type. His first wife was Catherine, the daughter of James MacDonald of Dunnyveg, Lord of the Isles. The O'Neill married Catherine while the MacDonnells were providing him with military support during the 1550s to contest the Lordship of Tyrone with his father Conn Bacach, at the time The O'Neill. If the alliance fell apart, the wife could return to her father in a form of political divorce. The custom among the nobility of sixteenth-century Ireland was for marriage to be undertaken to cement political alliances between powerful or enemy families.

Shane ONeills

(1911). Encyclopdia Britannica (11th ed.). This articleincorporates text from a publication now in the public domain:Chisholm, Hugh, ed. "O'Neill".

Shane was born in or just before 1530, to Conn Bacach O'Neill, chief of the O'Neills of Tyrone, and Sorcha O'Neill, daughter of Hugh Oge O'Neill, chief of the O'Neills of Clandeboye.[3] Shane's mother died while he was very young and Shane, following Gaelic custom, was fostered by the O'Donnelly family, who raised him until adulthood.

After the 1985 reformation, the club's U-14 side won the All-Ireland File title in 1987. Many of that team had graduated to the senior team by 1994, when Shane O'Neill's won the county Junior Championship, beating Ballymacnab by 113 to 208.