Loughgall (@1.57) vs H & W Welders (@4.1)
05-10-2019

Our Prediction:

Loughgall will win

Loughgall – H & W Welders Match Prediction | 05-10-2019 10:00

Eight were killed and the rest were badly wounded. The bombing was at Teebane Crossroads, near Cookstown. As the men were all Protestants, many Protestants saw it as a sectarian attack. One of the workers killed, Robert Dunseath, was an off-duty Royal Irish Rangers soldier.[57] The IRA said that the men were legitimate targets because they were "collaborating" with the "forces of occupation". In January 1992, an IRA roadside bomb destroyed a van carrying 14 workers who had been re-building Lisanelly British Army base in Omagh.

The emphasis, indeed, is very much on family pursuits. Loughgall Country Park is a rural haven of relaxation and recreation. A diverse spectrum of activities ranging from golf to walking, fishing to tennis make this spacious complex a mecca for families, sports enthusiasts and those merely in search of a helping of tranquility. Walking, cycling, a childrens play area, golf, fishing, an adventure trail, trim trail, football pitch and tennis courts are just some of the amenities on offer.

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His murder was the IRA's first act of terrorism since the Government replied on Thursday to Sinn Fin's 20 questions about the Downing Street Declaration.[55] His elder brother, Nigel McCollum, a civilian contractor to the Ministry of Defence, had died in a South Armagh Brigade mortar attack[56] one year earlier, on 8 March 1993, while working inside an Army base near Keady. A British Army helicopter was fired on in the aftermath of the ambush.[54] Another fatality was a RIR soldier, Private Reginald McCollum, from Cookstown who was abducted and shot dead while on leave; his body was found in the outskirts of Armagh City on 21 May 1994. At least five members of the security forces were killed by the IRA in around this area during the same period.[52][53] Among the killed were two constables shot dead while driving a civilian type vehicle in Fivemiletown's main street on 12 December 1993.

They were also questioned about the 1974 Dublin and Monaghan bombings,[11] and their weapons were checked in relation to forensic evidence from the murders in question.[13] Both protesters and media camped outside Dundalk station. Sir Arthur Galsworthy, then British ambassador to the Republic of Ireland, stressed his concern about the finding of a shotgun and a dagger among the weapons confiscated by the Garda, and the fact that most of the soldiers were in plain clothes, and that the two groups had given different accounts of their purposes of presence within the Republic of Ireland. The British Army Minister, Bob Brown, apologised to the Irish Government, saying the incursion over the border had been a mistake.[8] The British Government, embarrassed by the situation,[12] gave top priority to the immediate release of the soldiers. When it became clear that a trial was unavoidable, the British Government hardened its position, with a member of the Foreign Office proposing economic sanctions against the Republic, and even mooting the creation of a "buffer zone" along the border, which would have created "a no-man's land in which the terrorist could do what they would". The arrest and detention of eight British Army soldiers put Irish Taoiseach Liam Cosgrave and his coalition government in a dilemma; if he released them without charge he was giving a green light for further British military incursions into the Republic, but if he permitted them to be put on trial and they were convicted, diplomatic relations with Britain would be at risk.[8] A report published by Mr Justice Henry Barron in 2006 revealed that the soldiers were questioned whilst in Garda custody about the three murders, especially that of Seamus Ludlow that had been recently committed in the area. The detainees were subsequently moved under heavy armed escort to Dublin, where they were charged by the Special Criminal Court with possession of firearms with intent to endanger life, and for carrying firearms without a certificate.[8] The charges carried a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison.[11] The 8 soldiers were released on bail after the British embassy paid 40,000 and a helicopter flew them out of the state. There were concerns that the station could be attacked by a mob or the IRA at any moment seeking to get at the prisoners.

The SAS ambush had no noticeable long-term effect on the level of IRA activity in East Tyrone. Ed Moloney, Irish journalist and author of the Secret History of the IRA, states that the Provisional IRA East Tyrone Brigade lost 53 members killed in the Troubles, the highest of any rural Brigade area. The level of IRA activity in the area did not show any real decline in the aftermath: in the two years prior to the Loughgall ambush the IRA killed seven people in East Tyrone and North Armagh, and eleven in the two years following the ambush.[16] Additionally, most of the attacks which took place in County Fermanagh during this period of the Troubles were also launched from south Tyrone and Monaghan.[17] However, many of their remaining activists were young and inexperienced and fell into further ambushes, leading to high casualties by the standards of the low intensity guerrilla conflict in Northern Ireland.

Loughgall ambush

It thinks it can defeat them. Thousands of people attended their funerals, the biggest republican funerals in Northern Ireland since those of the IRA hunger strikers of 1981.[30]Gerry Adams, in his graveside oration, gave a speech stating the British Government understood that it could buy off the government of the Republic of Ireland, which he described as the "shoneen clan" (that is, Anglophile), but added "it does not understand the Jim Lynaghs, the Pdraig McKearneys or the Samus McElwaines. The IRA members killed in the ambush became known as the "Loughgall Martyrs" among IRA supporters.[29] The men's relatives considered their deaths to be part of a deliberate shoot-to-kill policy by the security forces.

In 2001 the European Court of Human Rights ruled that ten IRA men, including the eight killed at Loughgall, had their human rights violated by the failure of the British Government to conduct a proper investigation into their deaths.[22] The court did not make any finding that these deaths amounted to unlawful killing.[33] In December 2011, Northern Ireland's Historical Enquiries Team found that not only did the IRA team fire first but that they could not have been safely arrested.

Over + - Half-Time

The unidentified men were unwilling to leave the car until Irish Army soldiers came out of the bushes and pointed Heckler & Koch HK33 rifles at them in support of the Garda.[8] The two men, who wore plain clothes, were Fijian-born trooper Ilisoni Ligari and trooper John Lawson, both soldiers in the SAS. After the kidnapping and murder of Seamus Ludlow near Dundalk, the Republic's security forces stepped up their presence along the border.[8] A checkpoint was set up by the Garda and the Irish Army on Flagstaff Road[9] in the townland of Cornamucklagh, some 700 metres inside County Louth in the Republic.[10]At 10:40 pm, the Garda stopped a Triumph 2000 car coming from the north with two men inside.[10] The driver obeyed the signal to stop, but when questioned by the policemen about their destination, they avoided a straight answer. They were asked to step out of the vehicle after one Garda noticed that the passenger had what seemed to be a gun hidden under a map.

The extensive facilities offer considerable scope for pursuing a healthy lifestyle while at the same time providing an invaluable recreational outlet for children, even those of a very young age. Picnicking, jogging, exercising and just lazing are the optional extras..and these are free of charge! Theres something for everyone, from the zealous sports lover to the casual visitor who relishes the outdoor life.